August, 2011 archive

Job Announcement: Assistant/Associate Professor of African History, Johns Hopkins University

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

The Johns Hopkins University Department of History seeks a full-time tenure-track Assistant or tenured Associate Professor of African History, region open, beginning July 1, 2012. Period flexible, but late nineteenth into the twentieth century is preferred. We favor candidates whose research makes broad intellectual connections and/or spans regions. Ph.D. required by time of appointment. Please submit a cover letter, c.v., three letters of recommendation, research statement and writing sample by October 21 to: African History Search, Department of History, 301 Gilman Hall, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218. Johns Hopkins is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer committed to recruiting, supporting, and fostering a diverse community of outstanding faculty, staff, and students. Women and minorities are especially invited to apply.

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Climate Change and African Political Stability: “Can Political Institutions Avert Violence from Climate Change?”

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

That is the central question of a new CCAPS Research Brief released today. The report details an innovative research project by seven of the world’s top scholars of Constitutional Design and Conflict Management in Africa, organized by the Strauss Center. Each expert focuses on a different African country to determine if domestic political institutions affect whether climate shocks, and other disruptions, lead to violence or not. By studying past upheavals, the project aims to identify future strategies to minimize the human suffering and security consequences that could result from climate change in Africa: http://ccaps.strausscenter.org/articles/what-drives-climate-security-vulnerability

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Conference Report: Saharan Crossroads: Views from the South

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

This second conference with the theme of “Saharan Crossroads: Views from the South” brought together delegates and participants from many of the countries bordering the Greater Sahara from Morocco and Algeria in the North, to Mauritania, Senegal and Mali in the West, and other countries south of the Sahara including, Cameroon, Nigeria and Ghana, even South Africa. Up to thirty-six participants including academics, students, artists, professionals, NGO workers and policy-makers as well as participants from the US and several European countries such England, France and Belgium travelled to Niamey to exchange their thoughts about the Saharan-Sahelo world and its environs. The event brought into contact scholars and professionals of West Africa and North Africa, most of whom were visiting the region for the very first time.

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